PIG GROWTH PROMOTION BY ANTIMICROBIALS IS ASSOCIATED WITH ENHANCED INTESTINAL BARRIER FUNCTION

CATEGORY: Feed Additives

DATE:June 2016

AUTHORS: A.Mereu, J.J. Pastor, G.Tedó, I.R. Ipharraguerre

BOOK/JOURNAL:Journées de la Recherche Porcine, 48, 129-130

ABSTRACT:

Antimicrobial additives (AMA) have long been used to treat infections and promote pig growth. Published evidence suggests that some AMA have a direct anti-inflammatory effect on the intestine. Therefore, it seems reasonable to expect that the growth-promoting effect of AMA may be related to improvements in the gut barrier function. To test this hypothesis, 24 piglets were weaned (5.8 ± 0.34 kg), housed individually, and fed standard pre-starter (from weaning to d 14) and starter (from d 15 to d 42) diets without (CON, n = 12) or with (AMA, n = 12) antimicrobial compounds (pre-starter, 40 g/T tiamulin, 400 g/T chlortetraciclin and 2500 g/T zinc oxide; starter, 40 g/T tiamulin, 110 g/T chlortetraciclin and 2500 g/T zinc oxide). On d 42, segments of mid-ileum were harvested from 8 pigs/treatment and mounted on Ussing chambers for measurements of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TER) and short circuit current (Isc ). On average, animals in the AMA group did not consume more feed (507 vs 480 g/d), but gained more BW (377 vs 328 g/d, P < 0.01) and grew more efficiently (0.82 vs 0.78; P < 0.01) than CON pigs. As a result, AMA animals finished the study with a higher BW (18.7 vs 16.8; P < 0.01). Furthermore, AMA increased TER (163 vs 115 Ω∙cm2 , P = 0. 02) and decreased Isc (2.2 vs 6.1 μA cm2 ; P < 0.05). In conclusion, AMA feed supplementation resulted in improved animal growth and this response was associated with improved gut barrier function

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